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size and identification of racing marks

Printed From: Yachts and Yachting Online
Category: General
Forum Name: Race Management
Forum Discription: For race officers and competiors to discuss the topic
URL: http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=1109
Printed Date: 02 Dec 22 at 10:52am
Software Version: Web Wiz Forums 9.665y - http://www.webwizforums.com


Topic: size and identification of racing marks
Posted By: davehinks
Subject: size and identification of racing marks
Date Posted: 13 Oct 05 at 7:33pm

Dear ALL,

How many times did you get lost on the course  at an Open meeting this year? I think many clubs need to pull up their socks on this one. I've seen bouys which are the same colour as wreck or shallow water markers, bouys without letters or figures, with small figures about the same size as a car numberplate etc.  People drive long distances with high expectations and then get lost on the course! For starters I'd like to see a string and peg courseboard, marks at least 5 gallon capacity, numbers and letters at least the size we have to carry on our sails and always a lead boat available.  If you don't think I'm not identifying a real problem, read all the Y andY race reports that joke in the second paragraph about XYZ boats going very fast but in the wrong direction! Anybody out there agree/ disagree?

Best wishes

Dave Hinks

 

 

Race

 




Replies:
Posted By: redback
Date Posted: 13 Oct 05 at 8:07pm

Its a good point.  At Bough Beech we try and remove all unused marks and anyway our racing marks are quite different than anything else on the water.  In addition the marks we are using all have a flag pole attached which carries a green or red flag - thus indicating the way to round the mark.  The Outer Distance Mark on the start line is a different size and colour again and has an orange marker flag.  In this way we rarely have a problem - but its easy for us since we are virtually the only water users.

At Wilsonian SC (on the Medway) we use navigation bouys and since we are racing along a long stretch of relatively narrow water we use sometimes as many as 20 marks.  Its not ideal but there is little we can do about it and this does favour the locals.  For Opens we try and keep it simple but this can compromise the quality of the course.  For the locals the navigation is part of the challenge and I often hear people say I wouldn't want to race at this or that sea club because its boring doing triangles and sausages.  For the high performance skiff boats its quite a challenge because we often end up with legs which are close reaches or are extremely tight with the kite up. 

I'm against using safety boats to lead the way - their heart isn't in it and they often make a mistake.  Although on a big championship sized courses (beat 2km) then it is good if they standby the windward mark until the lead boats have got around it.



Posted By: Jack Sparrow
Date Posted: 13 Oct 05 at 8:46pm
Yep home advantage really sucks. But as you point out we have an
obligation to carry the correct size sail numbers and insignia surely there
should be a rules to describe acceptable mark shapes, numbers and size
and at the very least for open meetings.

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Posted By: Stefan Lloyd
Date Posted: 14 Oct 05 at 7:09am

Yes I've been lost. I've also been the only boat in a 30-strong fleet who went the right way; everyone else followed the leader to a mark laid for a different event entirely. Protesting the entire fleet was entertaining.

But to return to your point, if the committee boat is showing bearing to the windward mark, it makes sense to check it with a compass to 100% confirm which mark you are going to. I learned that one the hard way. 




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